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Radiator CAC changeout Series 60
#1
It was my turn to do this. The old radiator had severly corroded fins, and I was starting to notice the engine temps climb. It was running 196 to 205 which is OK but higher than I remembered. 
   

I sourced the radiator and CAC from Atlas in Corpus Christie. I won't bore you with the tight confined work of getting in and out but I did really learn some things on my first go round that may help someone in the future. 

Where is the radiator tag? Go to the outside door for the radiator, there is an aluminum trim piece riveted at the left side of the radiator. That trim piece has to be removed to see the tag. 

The best thing I did, on day two of the removal by the way, was construct a four foot long two foot wide table and exacly the same height as the engine bay floor. Having that table really gives you somewhere to stand or lay while you shimmy into the bay. 
   

If you remove the bolt in the center of the fan, you can gently tap the fan off the fan motor. It is a taper fit, not a threaded fit. You can't unthread it. Trust me on this one. 

The bolts holding the bottom fan shroud to the radiator frame were corroded. Some I could get enough hold on to break the head but two were being ugly. I used a dremel tool with a cut off wheel to gind away the nut from inside the shroud. 

Similar thing for the bolts that penetrate the floor holding the fan motor support.  I could get an angle grinder in there to cut the bolts off. 

Take the bottom shroud off first. And install it last. 

I talked to several folks who had done this and they told me the rad/cac comes out bolted together. All I can say is that was NEVER going to happen on my coach without a big cutting torch. So I took them out separately. CAC first, and then slid the radiator out on the aforementioned table. 

So obviously it had to go back in in two pieces. CAC first and slide the radiator under it. That's when I discovered that there was not only a gap between the two, but an unevern gap at that. Not wanting to stress the CAC and make it hold the weight of the radiator, I used the unused 1/4-20 holes in the bottom of the radiator frame for jacking screws. By using the screws I was able to lift the radiator the 1/8 inch or so at one end to perfectly fit to the CAC. 

Don't even thing about this with one of those radiator hose removal tools. They look like a long pick but the end is hooked so you can get it under the hose and break it loose from the connection. The tool and slightly soapy water also help when putting the hoses back on. 

Per Tom's suggestion, I used new silicone hose and new constant tension radiator clamps on the reinstall. 

Do replace the flex hose on the exhaust while you're in there. You will never have easier access. I would say mine needed it. 
   

By lifting one end of the radiator at a time onto the table, I made this a one man job. The table is the key. 

A forty mile test drive on a 90 degree day showed the temp to go to 196 when the tstats open and quickly drop to 192 so I definitely can see an improvement.
Richard and Rhonda Entrekin
99 Newell, 512
Subaru Outback Toad
Rhonda's FB (Rhonda Duggan Entrekin)
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#2
(05-03-2017, 02:05 PM)Richard Wrote: It was my turn to do this. The old radiator had severly corroded fins, and I was starting to notice the engine temps climb. It was running 196 to 205 which is OK but higher than I remembered. 


I sourced the radiator and CAC from Atlas in Corpus Christie. I won't bore you with the tight confined work of getting in and out but I did really learn some things on my first go round that may help someone in the future. 

Where is the radiator tag? Go to the outside door for the radiator, there is an aluminum trim piece riveted at the left side of the radiator. That trim piece has to be removed to see the tag. 

The best thing I did, on day two of the removal by the way, was construct a four foot long two foot wide table and exacly the same height as the engine bay floor. Having that table really gives you somewhere to stand or lay while you shimmy into the bay. 


If you remove the bolt in the center of the fan, you can gently tap the fan off the fan motor. It is a taper fit, not a threaded fit. You can't unthread it. Trust me on this one. 

The bolts holding the bottom fan shroud to the radiator frame were corroded. Some I could get enough hold on to break the head but two were being ugly. I used a dremel tool with a cut off wheel to gind away the nut from inside the shroud. 

Similar thing for the bolts that penetrate the floor holding the fan motor support.  I could get an angle grinder in there to cut the bolts off. 

Take the bottom shroud off first. And install it last. 

I talked to several folks who had done this and they told me the rad/cac comes out bolted together. All I can say is that was NEVER going to happen on my coach without a big cutting torch. So I took them out separately. CAC first, and then slid the radiator out on the aforementioned table. 

So obviously it had to go back in in two pieces. CAC first and slide the radiator under it. That's when I discovered that there was not only a gap between the two, but an unevern gap at that. Not wanting to stress the CAC and make it hold the weight of the radiator, I used the unused 1/4-20 holes in the bottom of the radiator frame for jacking screws. By using the screws I was able to lift the radiator the 1/8 inch or so at one end to perfectly fit to the CAC. 

Don't even thing about this with one of those radiator hose removal tools. They look like a long pick but the end is hooked so you can get it under the hose and break it loose from the connection. The tool and slightly soapy water also help when putting the hoses back on. 

Per Tom's suggestion, I used new silicone hose and new constant tension radiator clamps on the reinstall. 

Do replace the flex hose on the exhaust while you're in there. You will never have easier access. I would say mine needed it. 


By lifting one end of the radiator at a time onto the table, I made this a one man job. The table is the key. 

A forty mile test drive on a 90 degree day showed the temp to go to 196 when the tstats open and quickly drop to 192 so I definitely can see an improvement.

I think you could have buffed that corrosion out Richard.
1995 # 390
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#3
One follow up.

Both of the 3/4 NPT fittings where the transmission cooler hoses attach leaked like sieves after freeway driving. The ATF made a big mess in the bay and on the tow car. I know they were 3 ft wrench tight when I put it back in, but after the radiator was hot I was able to turn both of them almost two turns.

So, if you replace the radiator, you might plan to retighten those fittings once the unit is up to temp. And you won't see a leak while idling cause not enough fluid is being pumped to the cooler until you bring it up to speed.
Richard and Rhonda Entrekin
99 Newell, 512
Subaru Outback Toad
Rhonda's FB (Rhonda Duggan Entrekin)
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#4
i had put this on my post about radiators several years ago but will say it here as well.

after i changed all the silicon hoses everywhere and put new constant pressure clamps on (at least 2 clamps per location and 3 if they fit) i filling the system with coolant, then used a radiator pressure testing kit to put pressure on the system to check for leaks. i was in canada and it was warm during the day and cool at nite. it would hold pressure just fine when daytime but each morning when i checked it, it had some seepage somewhere. so i would tighten the clamps or adjust and then repeat. did that for 3 days or so before i got all the seepage fixed. we were in no hurry and during those three days we did not put the hydraulic fan or radiator shroud back on so we could still get to the back hoses.

just another way of being sure everything is leak free.

i was in no hurry either

tom
2002 45'8" Newell Coach 608  Series 60 DDEC4/Allison World 6 Speed HD4000MH

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#5
Good job Richard, hard work for one person.  I replaced my exhaust also along with the radiator.  Here is a picture of the tube,  the flex was equally as bad.  New blanket as well.

   
Gordon Jones
2000-45'-2slide-#567
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#6
I have had a positive and unexpected result from the radiator replacement OR adjusting the valves/injectors/jakes. After a 1000 miles of driving, my fuel mileage has increased 0.5 mpg. I don't know it if is because the fan is not coming on high as much to cool the engine, or if the valve adjustment made the difference. Either way, I am a happy camper.

The retightening of the trans cooler connections worked, and the bay is dry and clean now.
Richard and Rhonda Entrekin
99 Newell, 512
Subaru Outback Toad
Rhonda's FB (Rhonda Duggan Entrekin)
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