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Leak detection tools
#21
Chuck,

Here is what I do....

On the bottom of the ping tank associated with the 120V pump, I installed a quarter turn valve (Home Depot). The output of this valve goes to under the coach. I use it to let the accumulated water out of the ping tank.

It has the nice side effect of being able to dump the air out of the system. Turn off both pumps and open the valve. 10 seconds later no air in any of the house systems.

The bags will only deflate if they have a leak or you have a malfunctioning solenoid valve.
The seals could go either way. A couple of my seals have check valves and couple do not. In either case, it won't hurt to have the seal deflated while you work on something associated with the air system.

Cheers,
bill
Bill Johnson
2003 Newell #653 Quad Slide Cat C-12 engine with Motorcycle lift 
2011 Jeep Wrangler, 2018 BMW 1200GS Adventure Motorcycle
Auburn, Alabama
#22
Bill’s way works. Several other techniques for bleeding down the air system quickly are to turn off all compressors and gently and repeatedly pump brakes.

Or, my favorite is to use my “adaptor” that goes into the aux air supply port in the passenger side engine bay. The adaptor is used to supply external air to the coach. Mine is male quick connect on both ends with a quarter turn valve in the middle. Stick it in the port,open the quarter turn, and pressure is gone. Quickly.

You could also open the petcock on the ping tank located in the passenger drive wheel well. That tank needs to be drained anyhoo.

That configuration of tees and junctions at the 12V compressor is a great place to use Loctite 545 on the fittings. It is a jig saw puzzle to fit all those fittings together and align them without leaving one or two fittings a little on the loose side. The 545 is made to work in those less than ideal tightness conditions. Just give it 12 hrs to set before pressurizing the system.
Richard and Rhonda Entrekin
99 Newell, 512
Subaru Outback Toad
Inverness, FL (when we're home Cool )
#23
Thanks Bill and Richard for the info. I left the compressor off overnight as the project was interrupted. This morning, the slide seals were down as well - I'll take that as evidence of slight leakage in that circuit, unsurprisingly. The original dump valve circuit leak was fixed by replacing the offending push-in T with a compression fitting, beginning the gradual process of replacing all. Richard, I surmise that you use 545 instead of teflon as a thread sealant? Or is it involved somehow with a compression ferrule?
Compressor was coming on every 45 minutes with no appliance use - just now had two hours between compressor cycles including a toilet flush and a round trip of the air door. Victory lap.
2001 #579 ("Chester's Coach")
Lexus RX330 on an American Dolly
Cessna TU206F
#24
First of all, banish the teflon tape from your tool box. All it is good for is shredding little pieces and stopping up the air control valves. I like the yellow Rectorseal for pipe threads. The Loctite 545 is used on pipe threads where you may not be able to tighten them as tight as you normally would. It will seal threads that Rectorseal will not seal.

You don’t use any sealant on the compression side of the air fittings, only on the pipe thread side.

That’s my .02
Richard and Rhonda Entrekin
99 Newell, 512
Subaru Outback Toad
Inverness, FL (when we're home Cool )
#25
I am no expert in finding air leaks but the best tools I have run across so far are soap bubbles, sonic wands and Tom McCloud's ears, with Tom's ears being by far the best. Tom found several leaks for me when I was at his place back in April.
Glenn & Laureen Parker
Austin, Texas
1984 Newell 35'  (Coach #58? - not confirmed)
6v92 Detroit Diesel, Allison 5 speed trans
2005 Honda Element toad
2007 Honda S2000 fun car


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