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Dry storage risks ?
#1
Morning all,

This is my first post and excuse me being a newbie.  I'm looking to purchase a Newell between 1998-2002 but if I do, I will have to keep it in RV storage (fort benning) where there is no shore power hook up.  I'm hearing mixed messages on if that's okay or not and honestly will prevent me in buying one b/c a) there are no storages with power hook ups near me and b) I cannot park it next to my house.


I was told that as long as I don't store it with slides open and run everything once a month the air seals won't air out and bring in moisture.

However, my uncle who has a 98 newell says there is risk in storing it w/o power.  

I have a hard time believing that b/c in my mind there are going to be a heck of a lot more people that are in my situation than those that are either full timing or storing with power but maybe I'm wrong about the % of Newell owners.

Please if you have the time, I would like to know your thoughts on the risks of storing it dry b/c if I cannot then I sadly cannot purchase one.  Thanks in advance! 

-Brad
#2
Seems like there may be 2 issues you will need to deal with. First is the batteries, both chassis and house. Adding shut-off switches that positively shuts each set off will help keeping the batteries from discharging while stored.
Second are the slide seals. IIRC some gurus have added a shutoff valve where the bladders connect to the air regulator which allows them to isolate the bladder from leaks.
Will your coach be in the sun? If so then adding a solar panel should keep the house and chassis batteries charged if wired correctly. Your coach should have a 12 Vdc air compressor which will keep the bladders and a couple other things going but will discharge the house batteries over a period of time. Thus the solar system will keep them charged.
There are solutions to almost all problems!
Forest & Cindy Olivier
1999 Foretravel 36' U320
former 1998 Newell 45' 2 slide #486 

former 1993 Newell 39' #337 
2011 Chevy Tahoe 

2010 Silverado w/ RZR 570LE
#3
Folivier, thanks for the quick reply.

It would be stored in the sun which a solar panal may be a good idea. So without having shut off switches to the house and starter batteries, they would still drain power even if I shut everything off?

In regards to the slide seals, I was told that as long as I ran everything at least once a month, the slide seals wouldn't be an issue. Now the coach I'm talking about does have a secondary compressor to help keep things aired. Are you saying that if I turned everything off and stored it, that compressor would still try to keep things aired and use up battery juice?
#4
Let me add to the excellent commentary by Forest. I'll try to come at it from the angle of helping a new owner to evaluate the situation.

As you already know, the critical item is keeping the slide seals inflated. In my experience, the air seal system is NOT airtight enough to shut off the seal and expect it to stay inflated for extended periods. I cannot quantify that, because I suspect each and every coach may have a different leak rate on the seals. "I was told that as long as I don't store it with slides open and run everything once a month the air seals won't air out and bring in moisture". That statement may or may not be true depending on the individual coach.

Most coaches will supply the slide seals from the 12v auxillary pump. The pump will also supply the potties, and the interior air doors, and possibly the Bode door. How long one could run off the house batteries to just leave the 12V pump as the air source is dependent on the state of the house batteries and the leak rate of all the things supplied by the 12V pump. Again, I cannot quantify that.

However, in evaluating coaches, if you must store dry, confirm that ALL the slide seals are supplied by the 12V pump. I know of one coach where that is not the case.

The reason we are focusing on the 12v pump is Newell designed and built the coach so that the super critical air systems could be supplied by the most energy efficient air compressor. Running the 120VAC compressor through an inverter is not nearly as energy efficient as the straight 12V pump

An inelegant solution is to tape the slide openings. You won't be able to access the area under the slide toppers if the coach has them, but it will keep rain and critters out. The downside is it would be a pain, adhesive residue to clean, and obviously has to be redone with each slide deployment.
Richard and Rhonda Entrekin
99 Newell, 512
Subaru Outback Toad
Inverness, FL (when we're home Cool )
#5
An inelegant solution is to tape the slide openings.  The downside is it would be a pain, adhesive residue to clean, and obviously has to be redone with each slide deployment.

Try this tape.  Resistant to water.  Leaves no residue to clean up and releases from the paint easily.

https://www.lowes.com/pd/Shurtape-Stucco-Tape/3063563
Steve Bare
1999 Newell 2 slide #531
#6
+1 stucco tape. Use it for everything!
2008 Newell #1234
Boulder, CO

#7
+2 on the Stucco Tape, carry a roll in the event of a slide seal problem.  It does stick very good so I use a high shear peeling technique (peel back over itself at 30 +- degree angle) to remove.

Steve
Steve & Doris Denton
45' Newell #525, Bath & Half
2014 Honda CRV Toad


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